No one is immune to workplace stress. Regardless of your job and how much you enjoy it, you will more than likely experience workplace stress. The key is in realizing when you’re in a stressful situation and learning how to manage this workplace stress.

While we admit that every workplace stress scenario is different, we do know that there are some common stressors for court reporters. So whether you’re a Pittsburgh court reporter or are working in another city, it’s important you’re ready to manage and overcome workplace stress.

In this article we’ll dig into workplace stress and highlight ways you can manage this stress. Remember, you should never be working in a situation where you feel harassed, overworked, or neglected. We know it’s hard to speak up when your work environment is negative, but you owe it to yourself to be proactive. Remember, there are a lot of opportunities for court reporters so don’t feel as though you have no options. In fact, you never know what doors will open as a result of speaking up and being proactive.

Court Reporters and Workplace Stress

When most people think of stressful careers, they don’t think of court reporting. Instead, people think of healthcare professionals, lawyers, CEOs of major companies, and other similar positions.

However, as we and you know, being a court reporter can be very stressful. On a daily basis, you can be exposed to disturbing court testimony, tight deadlines, demanding colleagues, and simply feel like you can’t keep your head above water.

As you know these stress sensations can become chronic, culminating with you no longer enjoying or wanting to go to work. Even worse are the chronic impacts of stress including:

  • Regular feelings of worry or anxiety.
  • Abnormal sleeping patterns.
  • Feeling overwhelmed or suffocated with deliverables.
  • Moodiness and/or short temper.
  • Poor health.
  • Depression.
  • Low job confidence and a fear of making mistakes.

We want to make sure that you know the signs and symptoms of chronic stress and have the tools and support system to recover from workplace stress. Research by the American Psychological Association reveals that more people than we realize are suffering from the impacts of workplace stress.

How to Manage Workplace Stress

Every workplace is different, but these tips can help you manage workplace stress and regain control of your job satisfaction.

  • Plan It Out. Your workday is busy. Your day away from work is busy. Have a plan or schedule that helps you keep track of where you need to be and when. Using a mobile scheduling app that buzzes to remind you of your next court session or to take lunch can be very helpful.
  • Set Priorities. As a court reporter, you’re in high demand and this means you get pulled in multiple directions. Set your daily, weekly, and monthly priorities so you know where to really focus your energy. Know which deliverables take priority and make sure you have the time and energy to devote to them. Your goal is giving each transcript equal attention so there are no errors or last-minute rush transcriptions.
  • Breathe In and Out. Get outside for lunch. Take a walk between sessions. Remember that this is a job. You are not defined by being a court reporter. Yes, you love your job but you are also a human being. Think of the big picture and remember that you’ve got friends and family who love you and want you to be healthy and happy.
  • Teamwork. If you work with other Pittsburgh court reporters or in a company that hires multiple court reporters, you can support one another. Meet once-a-week (preferably on a Monday) to plan out the week and to determine who can help whom with different transcriptions and deliverables. If you work with remote court reporters, think of using a tool such as Slack or Skype to easily communicate and work together.

Remember, no job should take over your life. You shouldn’t be so consumed with your job that you bring work home with you or that you can’t stop talking about work. Give yourself the time and space to enjoy your favorite activities and hobbies. Talk to your boss about your schedule and make yourself a priority.

We urge you to share this article with your fellow court reporters, you never know who is struggling with workplace stress and needs some help.